WEDNESDAY WORKOUT TID BIT BLOG

Firstly, I would like to say I am so excited and honored to write our first Run Coast 2 coast blog. I have been passionate about working out, exercising and leading a healthy lifestyle for many years. My parents have been a great influence in raising my brother and I that way. When I was younger I was always outside running around, playing basketball with my brother or going to dance classes. It was not until my early 20s did I start to get into running and training. One thing I have noticed over the years is how little focus there is on balance and stretching.

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Today I am going to focus on balance and in a later edition I will talk about stretching. Many people do not understand the benefits of adding balance into their daily routines or as a supplement to their training regimen. Balance not only helps you catch yourself if you accidentally trip or go to fall, but it also provides improved coordination, a strong core, which in turn will help you overall with your training. Balance is key especially in activities of daily living especially living in a city such as New York City where the majority of the population walks everywhere and does not drive. There are many day to day hazards throughout the city that could potentially make you lose your balance and fall.

Balance is needed when walking through a busy train!

Balance is needed when walking through a busy train!

How long can you balance like this?

How long can you balance like this?

Over the past couple of years of teaching Mat Pilates, Zumba classes and training my clients, I have incorporated balance exercises into every class or session. It is very challenging at the beginning to hold one leg even an inch off of the floor. However, now my clients and classes can balance for more than a minute without teetering and some close their eyes as well to add another level of difficulty.

Food for thought: See how long you can balance. Try to balance on one foot with hands at your hips or if need be at the beginning holding onto a chair or even the wall.